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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
was willing to face the court of law and he was even willing to go to jail if necessary. so he's come back and wants to fight it out. however, this would be one disappointed man given the fact that you saw in that report he's been disqualified from all people. so a major setback for musharraf. >> that's our correspondent joining from us islamabad. thank you. egypt is facing its worst economic crisis in decades, and yet not everyone is impressed with billions of dollars pouring in from some neighboring countries. that story is coming up. plus, the drugs in west africa, find out why nigeria has becoma. >> there was just a major, major explosion. >> police in texas say an explosion at a fertilizer plant has killed as many as 15 people, as well as injuring more than 150. local emergency services are treating the victims from the nearby stadium. investigate -- investigate tords may have found i amages of a potential suspect in the boston marathon bombing. a court in pakistan has ordered the arrest of former president, pervez musharraf, local tv showed him leaving the court after the ruling. mus
it was so hard to talk about. i've talked to doctors and law enforcement officials who have seen a lot of bad things in their day and they have a hard time talking about the carnage they saw yesterday. pamela, thank you very much. >> reporter: we're just getting word into cnn that president obama will make a statement 11:30 a.m. eastern time from the white house briefing room. not sure if it's an update on the investigation, if he has new news. but, again, that statement coming at 11:30 a.m. eastern time. we will of course bring it to you the second it happens. what happened in boston was terrifying for hundreds who were there at the scene when the bombs went off. it's terrifying to look at the video. cassidy brettler witnessed the terror firsthand. this is what she told cnn. >> i don't know. i mean, honestly, i got home last night about 11:00 and started to break down because i had been holding it in all day. i had been trying to remain composed. on social media and video just portray what was going on and tell my story. but by the time i was trying to fall asleep, it was hitting me,
talked about the fact and law enforcement talked about the fact that they'd been through about 60% to 70% of the entire area. i'm assuming that in the hours since then, it's now, of course, 4:05 eastern time, but they made progress close to 100%. >> reporter: yeah, but what's the area? remember, the entire city is in lockdown now. they have told everybody in boston not to leave their homes, not to open their doors, except to law enforcement officers. so while they might be able to inspect the immediate area around here in watertown, it seems a herculean task to be able to do that for the entire metropolitan region that's essentially in lockdown right now. look, there's a massive police and military presence, actually, here, actually, it's right behind me, the staging area is right behind where i'm standing here at the parking lot of the watertown arsenal here. we've had early this morning convoys of military humvees, bus loads of police and state troopers coming in here and assembling for what we thought was going to be some sort of massive confrontation or assault here. we had blackhawk
will be placed on the record for those who stood up for sensible gun safety laws in america. i think jo put it well. the parents who have come here and the family members -- i think joe put it well. the parent to have come here in the family members, we need to find a political courage with the disappointment in this vote today. this is not the end. there is more that we can do and will do. reaching out to convince members who voted the other way today and perhaps in the next election to challenge them. bring the issue forward to the american people. this is worth the fight. we have got to stand up to bring sensible gun safety to america. god forbid what tomorrow's victims will be, but we know they will be there. we have to do everything we can to spare another family from this agree. thank you. let me salute all of my andeagues, particularly joe the families who have lit a candle. that is a hard, hard thing to do when you go through what they went through. you do not want to get out of bed, let alone come here and argue truth to power, which you have done. it will not be forgotten. it will
of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather, is grounded in a hoe row and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constitute torture. in addition, you look at the united states state department, in its annual country reports on human rights practices, has characterized many of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in the post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse, or cruel treatment when those techniques were employed by foreign governments. the c.i.a. recognized this in an internal review and that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with policy, positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticized another nation for engaging in tor
it into law. that undertaking and many others, john berry made a real difference of the more than 62,000 federal workers and everyone else who called my district home. just as we look to our federal workers to watch out for us, our federal workers look to john to watch out for them, to make sure they have a safe work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national z
of retirement and health care benefits is consistent with what is required by the federal law of ups, federal express and every other almost every other corporation in the country it would be very similar. >> it could be different from what the private sector companies are doing. i would like to know, i would like to make that available to the postal employees that i represent throughout the country. >> you are correct but it's not the same for health care benefits. i will provide a more detailed record. >> you are saying the postal service now is operating at 140% of current revenue; is that the number you gave? >> drm laes, unfunded liabilities. >> bankruptcy would probably be where they are. >> finally let me go to something completely unrelated. you testified he wanted more flexibility in their rates in respect to packaging the monopoly on first-class they would have it facto monopoly on the third clause catalogs and what people would refer to as door hangers and nobody has the reach you do. how do you give that flexibility without giving you the power to do sweetheart deals and take the
as new york city's mayor during the 2001 world trade center terrorist attacks, a partner at the law firm. good to have you with us. >> best to be with you. lou: first, let's start with the fact that there ruled out the young man who apparently was the person of interest, not a suspect saying that he had nothing to do with it. what does that suggest to you about where they are? >> it is a setback. in the murder investigation, terrorism investigation, the logger it takes to solve the less of a chance you have to solve it. it's just a progression, a formula that is there. so they spend focusing on one person. seems to me they're now back at ground zero try to figure out how to put this all together. so when i heard them ask earlier today for everybody to cooperate photographs, i was hoping that that was a ploy and they already had a photograph from their own surveillance. apparently it out. lou: in nearly every city, obviously more familiar with new york city and boston, closed-circuit television almost everywhere. these cameras. how much surveillance to you expect there is? i have been, fr
of border enforcement as part of its broader anti-crime law enforcement. those efforts were part of that democratic thinking and action at the time. they took up the issue of border enforcement in a role that has become a tint to it -- a continuous stream since research. intoudgets that went building the border and building the southwest border capability started in 1994. those budgets, i think when you look back at the record, the official start. taking border enforcement seriously. and putting a border effort into place that has become, since, a bipartisan support it issue. the question of putting them into the border has been a continuous stream since 1994. requests and appropriations, when republicans and democrats led the white house and both republicans and democrats led either in the senate or house overall. this is an unbroken chain and continues to go. we see it in day to day. we will see when a bill is announced tomorrow or whenever, having continuing emphasis on border security and on spending on border security. with the initial budget, we worked on the border in ways
the latest out of the boston area. it began last night, in fact. two men identified by law enforcement sources as the boston marathon attack suspects armed with explosives and guns were battling authorities in a suburb of boston suburb watertown this morning. there was chaos until police took one man into custody and the other one fled. he is said to be armed and dangerous. one of the suspects taken into custody is dead. the other is still on the run. the standoff erupted shortly after the shooting of a police officer. now, references the photograph released by the fbi on thursday, authorities say it's the white hat suspect known as suspect number two who remains on the loose. again, as authorities told us in a preference conference this morning, he is considered armed and dangerous, a threat to anybody who might approach him. that's why the authorities in that area are warning residents in the area to stay in their homes. they're warning motorists, as well, moving through obviously not to pick up anyone that they might see on the road. there are reports of explosive devices. one resid
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
of things going for new law enforcement, do you usually get your man rather quickly? >> it depends what your man has done. and what his network is. so let's talk about things that will make that more likely than less likely. if these guys, you know, have a community, if they are from the united states, if they are in college and there's fellow students who know them. if they are from boston and people right there recognize them this could wrap up tonight. on the other hand f these guys came in from another country, simple as down from canada, or across from europe, if their social network isn't here f they left two days ago. >> rose: right. >> that makes it harder. it's its difference between a shazad case a times square truck bomber who is caught within 72 hours, say, and an eric robert rudolph case, the olympic bomber who it took years to find, even after we knew exactly who he was and what he looked like. >> rose: but he was in mainly a rural area. >> he was hiding in a national forest, and you know, they scanned that-- they scanned that with night vision, motion detector. i mean a lot of
obviously will affect complying with the law of the land if we have to. i may follow-up -- do you you right now have intentions for a timetable of when the department would get back to the committee on its intention and plan for complying -- >> this is evolving and i have that they the review are leading, and then we will proceed on that basis. i don't want an expectation here that isn't correct. that is why wanted to make sure. -- i understand what is expected. as to your bastions about overseas, overhead, and the other observations you made about how we are assessing what we have to do to comply with these new realities. consolidatingeen and closing facilities overseas for the last few years. we will have a study complete by the end of this month -- this on additional recommendations on closing facilities and consolidating overseas. so, yes, that has been ongoing. i and thee time, president think, the leadership of the doj, but we also need to look at our infrastructure in this country as well. >> can i have a couple of facts -- we transferred more than 100 sites back to our allies since
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)